women walking in fields of corn

I received a letter in the post recently informing me that I needing a cervical screening.

I immediately panicked at the terminology before realising (thanks to Google) that this was the fancy term for a smear test. The negative association around a smear wasn’t the best PR push to get women checking their cervix so I’m all for this new spin on things.

It had been three years since my last smear, so the letter took me by surprise in all honesty.

I’d completely forgotten about the test I lovingly refer to as, ‘eyelash curlers, down there’.

No one, no one, likes a smear test and that’s to be accepted. You’re not popping in for your enjoyment.

Yes, it’s uncomfortable but it’s freaking vital and could be live saving so it’s not up for negotiation in my eyes.

I had it done today which has prompted my post and despite a trip to the surgery last week which ended in a nurse unable to find my womb, which was hiding FFS.

I arrived today to meet a doctor and nurse duo, gloved-up and determined to track that bad girl down (they did and promptly too). I took some deep breaths, chatted about what I was doing today and it was all over.

It’s not a mandatory test but it’s advised so I wanted to appeal to anyone putting it off.

I had it done because I want to live. I want to keep on top of my health and give my best go at prevention so I can stick around for those kids of mine. So I can keep pushing towards making my dreams a reality, and enjoying the fruits of my labour and life. So I can walk in the freaking corn fields the girl in the photo (not me) is doing.

So I can get in quick if problems arise.

According to the NHS website, ‘the aim of the NHS Cervical Screening Programme is to reduce the number of women who develop cervical cancer and the number of women who die from the condition. Since the screening programme was introduced in the 1980s, the number of cervical cancer cases has decreased by about 7% each year’.

Being screened means that any abnormal changes in the cells of the cervix are detected and treated to stop that dirty C word from developing.

Yes to that.

I started my blog initially in November 2010 to reach other parents who like myself might have felt alone, lacking in confidence and in need of a virtual friend, because I sure was.

I never, not for a nanosecond thought I’d reach millions through my work, or that I’d be deemed an influencer in any way, but that’s what happened.

I want to use my role for good. I want to influence others to put themselves and their health first.

Please don’t put that smear off.

Thanks for reading.


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4 Responses

  1. Susan Mann

    I just got mine done recently and it is so important for women to get this done. Much better to get a quick result and good when ok x

  2. Mirka Moore @Kahanka

    Thanks for this post lovely! I actually had a positive test 6 months after giving birth to Isabelle, and was so worried. Then I had a procedure done, and “touch wood” everything has been fine since. Because of that I have been having smear tests done more frequently and always worry, but I also know the importance of finding out early makes a huge difference! xxx
    Mirka Moore @Kahanka recently posted…Stylish Sandals for this SummerMy Profile


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