woman looking into the distance

Argh, water infections are so flipping annoying. They can cause pain, weakness, dizziness and vomiting.

I had the most horrendous episode during my second pregnancy with Alexander which was a truly scary experience too, ended up with me being hospitalised for 10 days. I’d never felt worse, to be honest, I couldn’t walk and it took a while for the hospital to find the right antibiotics to fight the infection.

It’s frightening because UTIs can bring on early labour and I was informed from the start how high-risk water infections can be in pregnancy. The weird thing was, I had tested negatively several times via a dip test before ending up in the hospital with high fevers, with even the lab test coming back negative despite me being so ill. It was so odd that a professor and his medical students popped by to see me on the ward as I was some kind of UTI anomaly. Nice.

Since that time, (and I’m incredibly grateful Xander was fine and I recovered quickly) I’ve been more vulnerable to water infections but tend to only get one a year now.

Over this time, I’ve picked up some tips on helping prevent them from my GP and wisdom found online so I wanted to share these here.

I’m writing this to help you but please do go in to see your doctor if you’re concerned you might have a UTI. A urine test takes minutes.

So what is a water infection/UTI?

As Prevention.com state, ‘UTI happens in one of two ways: when outside bacteria get pushed into the urethra, or when bacteria already in the bladder multiply to unhealthy levels. Most UTIs are caused by bacteria that’s already in the bladder, so flushing it out is the most important way to stave off infection, which leads me to my first tip.

Drink your daily recommend amount of fluid as this dilutes urine so bacteria find it harder to grow. 8 glasses/ 2 litres is the recommended amount for women and tea counts towards this. If water bores you, add sliced strawberries and mint leaves and I love to wake to a big squeeze of fresh lemon in still water.

Don’t hold your wee in, go to the loo every few hours if you can to prevent the kind of environment bacteria love, and make sure you pee after you have sex flushing out bacteria that could have moved to the bladder.

Wear 100% cotton pants which won’t irritate and go commando at night to let your bits breathe.

Opt for showers over a bath for the most part as showers are the cleanest way to erm, clean yourself or if like me you live for a bath, opt for natural, paraben-free, non-irritating products and don’t languish in there for hours. Equally and it sounds silly, but make sure you don’t sit on the loo for too long either, answering emails or checking FB on there.

Keep the toilet clean too, spraying anti-bac and bleaching regularly.

Kids can get poo on the seat and sometimes it’s not always visible so make sure you are constantly cleaning the bog to prevent bacteria contaminating you.

Probiotics are everything. I love Optibac and take them daily for general wellbeing and to ensure good bacteria live in my gut. The irony is that a cycle of antibiotics from a UTI means good vaginal bacteria can be diminished so make sure you make taking a supplement a priority.

Do you suffer from UTI’s, I’d love to read what’s helped you.

water infections

 

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